The night of the hunters moon

Forum about the british singer Sally Oldfield. Talk about her music, her life, everything.
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Klingsor
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The night of the hunters moon

Post by Klingsor » Mon Oct 25, 2004 22:51

I learnt from an old dictionary, that in Ireland the first full moon in October is called the Hunter's Moon. I don't know where this name is derived from, but the full moon in October is ever since been magical to me.
Next Thursday is this year's Night of the Hunter's Moon. How can we celebrate it? Any suggestions?

Klingsor
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Not to forget: Total eclipse of the Moon

Post by Klingsor » Tue Oct 26, 2004 22:26

In the middle of the night (3:00-5:45 GMT+2h) there will be a total eclipse oft the Hunters Moon. That is magical!

mdj
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Post by mdj » Wed Oct 27, 2004 9:42

Actually not, it is simply the moon passing through the earth's shadow, which is in the shape of a cone pointing in the opposite direction of the sun. This can only happen to a full moon, just like an eclipse of the sun can only happen at a new moon. Further, these situations can only occur at two points in time during the year with 6 months between, one point is right now in April, the other point is right now in October (but these two points "drift" backwards in the calendar as the years pass), and only if the full or new moon coincides "sufficiently" with those two points in time. The solar eclipse is also geographically limited.
;-)
Morten Due Jørgensen
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mdj
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Post by mdj » Fri Aug 12, 2005 13:56

I just stumbled over the movie "The Night of the Hunter" on IMDB (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048424/), and I recalled this thread. Don't think the movie is related to the Hunter's Moon though, but I just saw a lovely tangent to take... - and the movie did score quite high.

I also found this article by Nasa, which explains the origin of the expression, and of course the astronomical aspects: http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004 ... clipse.htm

A bit outdated perhaps, but this forum needs some volume! :-)
Last edited by mdj on Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:38, edited 3 times in total.
Morten Due Jørgensen
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Klingsor
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The night of the hunter

Post by Klingsor » Wed Aug 17, 2005 21:27

... directed by Charles Laughton ... maybe I should look for it.

I looked up the description at http://www.filmsite.org/nightof.html. Robert Mitchum performing as a psycho with "love" and "hate" tatooed on his fingers. Maybe I saw it, year's ago, but I don't know for shure.
But I agree: I don't think that it has anything to do with Sally's song. RM was definitely not a 'man of the sun' in this movie.

Maybe we should ask Sally herself for what reason she was inpired by the Hunter's Moon. :wink:
Last edited by Klingsor on Sun Aug 28, 2005 18:40, edited 1 time in total.

Don
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Post by Don » Sat Aug 27, 2005 2:57

How about celebrating it by listening to Sally CD's and pausing every now and then to send your heartfelt thanks and love to Sally for all the love she has brought into this world.

Klingsor
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Agreed

Post by Klingsor » Sun Aug 28, 2005 22:49

Good idea, Don,
this will be this year the night from Sunday, 16th of October, to Monday 17th. Maybe we shoult celebrate it with some new wine and poetry.

:D

But - after all - that doesn't answer the question. What does this night stand for?
:?:

mdj
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Post by mdj » Thu Sep 01, 2005 9:37

The answer, my friend, is found in the Nasa article:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004 ... clipse.htm

And you don't have to be a rocket scientist.

:-)
Morten Due Jørgensen
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Klingsor
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I don't believe in rocket scientists

Post by Klingsor » Thu Sep 01, 2005 21:21

And I don't fall silent when a rocket scientist trys to explain lore with some homebrewn etymology :evil:. I just need some evidence to get convinced.

I'm no rocket scientist - that's true. Maybe it the author of that article is... or maybe he's a hunter with a romantic touch. His explanation did not convince me at all. It's just what he thinks.

I keep looking for a better answer.

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Post by mdj » Thu Sep 22, 2005 14:29

Well, I think the explanation sounds rather plausible, but I agree a reference to other sources would have been nice. I don't know, if this site is more trustworthy, but at least it confirms it:
http://www.farmersalmanac.com/astronomy ... names.html
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starfire
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Post by starfire » Mon Oct 10, 2005 21:44

next sunday^monday is hunters moon night ~ sally is in merry england
about to start up her website * it would be perfect for her to return then.
i'll raise my cup and offer a faerie blessing to her health and wellbeing!
john lester jaks aka starfire

Klingsor
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I join in your toast, Starfire!

Post by Klingsor » Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:47

May she prosper in the land of mists!


Actually I did. Huntes moon was a warm and stary night in Germany, rather a night of late summer than of autumn. Nevertheless the young wine is sweet though (Something Sally won't get on her Island - young wine and onions cake)


What a change - leaving the land of rain for the Island of fog :wink: I'm waiting for her website.

Klingsor
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Calender thoughts

Post by Klingsor » Thu Oct 27, 2005 12:24

While I'm still messing around here: The question of hunters moon is still haunting me.

If it was for the actual hunters and the falling leaves, the month of November what be more suitable, than the leaves are down. This year the weather in Germany is pretty late: The October is nearly over and the trees are just changing colour. If the weather forecast is right we will have Indian Summer still November. How strange.
Nevertheless: you can't see through a wood by moonlight... you have to clean it from bushes first, even whithout leaves.

I finally found a half mythical approach that suits better with my romantic needs. On the 23rd of September is the autumn equinox, begin of autumn. In three out of four cases the first full moon in October will be the first full moon in autumn.
If you look at the spring equinox - start of spring - you'll find that the first full man after the begin of spring is the feast of fertility in spring: Eastern. Actually it's nowadays celebrated on the first sunday following the first full moon in spring, but that feast is older than the devision of time into weeks. Some Scholars claim that there has been a German goddess of fertility named 'Ostera' - but that claim isn't very trustworthy. Lets stick to that: there's a fertility celebration following the first full moon in spring celebrated with coloured eggs etc.
This date has a celtic face as well: the holy marriage of field and forrest (crop and game) represented by the couple of Epona and Herne. You might know them from the 'Mists of Avalon' (there's a lot of rubbish in that book, but the well is not totally poisoned [though Zimmer Bradly truly tried]). Eastern has a very female perfume, it's about giving live and fertility of the field, the celebration of a mother goddess.
Half a year later it might be counterbalanced my the celebration of a male god on the first full moon of autumn. This would be Herne the hunter. Shakesperians might know his outer looks from the Merry Wifes of Windsor, when fat Tatuffe is made to dress in deer skin and skull to meet the women in the forrest --- and fled as a spook.

There is another habit of deviding the year - the beginn of summer on Belthain (first of May - the day following the night of Walburga (something like Hallween celebrated in Germany)) and the begin of winter on Somehain (first of November (all Saints) celebrated as Halloween (holies eve) odn the night before). Maybe that's a reason why Halloween isn't quite accepted in Germany (though merchands try hard to merchandise it): We do it in May, when the weather is better.

That's a bit strange by the way: There's less ado about Walpurgis in the German shops, no broomsticks or plastic witches for sale, although nearly everybody celebrates it by dancing till midnight, planting a freedom tree or (specially the boys) driving through the night to decorate the house of their beloved ones with fresh green leaves and coloured ribbons in the dew of the night. Well ... or simply having a drink ... enough to see witches high in the sky flying to Blocksberg where they have their party.

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